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Saturday, November 1, 2014

Module 5 Blog Post on Red Queens and Increasing Returns



Module 5 Blog Post on Red Queens and Increasing Returns
            In knowledge-based companies, opposing companies compete in winner-takes-all markets. Arthur (1996) states that active managers that want Increasing Returns watch for the next wave of technology that is coming. They work towards figuring out what shape it will take, and the position their company will take to gain an advantage. As related technologies emerge, competition may occur between two new emerging technologies. Thornburg (Laureate Education, 2014e) points out that with Increasing Returns, by chance – one technology gets locked in and drives the other technology into extinction. An example of Increasing Returns is the battle between Panasonic VHS video tapes and Sony Betamax video tapes. Betamax video tapes give a higher quality picture in comparison to VHS video tapes. However, Panasonic at the time was able to provide available software and pre-recorded videos that were more cost effective at the time. As a result, the Panasonic VHS video format obsoletes the Sony Betamax video format. Thornburg (Laureate Education, 2014e) states that the concept of “Increasing Returns” comes from a branch of mathematics known as Chaos and Complexity Theory. Theorists can apply mathematical equations to help explain the emergence of new technologies. Emerging technologies do not follow a linear process. The process is always nonlinear.
    
The Red Queen is a result of the two technologies competing against each other. Thornburg (2013d) says that with the Red Queen, the two competitive technologies compete at such a rapid pace. Both technologies start running as fast as they can, yet, no matter how fast they run; they seem to be staying in the same place. The concept of the Red Queen reigns from Lewis Carroll’s (1946) novel Through the Looking Glass.

In Module 4, the assignment was to obtain a science fiction movie – identify, and characterize the different technologies. Fortunately, I was able to find my DVD copy of the movie Star Trek into Darkness (2013). There is a current competition in the video industry between DVDs and video-on-demand. The two competitors are an example of a Red Queen rivalry.
Thornburg (2013e) examines Marshall McLuhan’s Laws of Media, which impact the nature of new and emerging technologies. There are many consumers that wish to own and buy DVDs.  DVDs enhance the ability for consumers to watch videos through both DVD players and computers. DVDs obsolete the use of video cassette players. DVDs also rekindle the experience of families selecting a program to watch together. DVD sales can also reverse to video-on-demand. 

Video-on-demand enhances a consumer’s video rental experience. Consumers can use their TV and cable remotes to rent or buy a video they wish to see. Video-on-demand also obsoletes video outlet stores such as Blockbuster. Now, consumers do rent movies through Red Box at their local retail stores. Video-on-demand can one day obsolete the purchase of DVDs. Video-on-demand rekindles the experience of families selecting a program to watch together. Video-on-demand can one day reverse to a device such as Google Glass.


References
Arthur, W. B. (1996). Increasing returns and the new world of business. Harvard Business
Review, 74(4), 100−109.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Laureate Education (Producer). (2014e). David Thornburg: Increasing returns [Video file].
Baltimore, MD: Author.
Laureate Education (Producer). (2014g). David Thornburg: Red queens [Video file]. Baltimore,
MD: Author.
Thornburg, D. (2013c). Emerging technologies and McLuhan's laws of media. Lake Barrington,
IL: Thornburg Center for Space Exploration.
Thornburg, D. (2008). Emerging Technologies and McLuhan's Laws of Media. Used with permission of David Thornburg.
Thornburg, D. (2013d).  
Red queens, butterflies, and strange attractors: Imperfect lenses into emergent technologies. Lake Barrington, IL: Thornburg Center for Space Exploration.
Thornburg, D. (2014). Red Queens, Butterflies, and Strange Attractors: Imperfect Lenses into Emergent Technologies. Licensed via Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivs 3.0 United States License. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/us/ Third-party images removed.
Photo Credits
Images of Beta & VHS Tapes: Image of DVDs: Image of The Red Queen: Image of Video on Demand:

Friday, October 24, 2014

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Module 4 Blog Post on the Disruptive Power of Google Glass

Module 4 Blog Post on the Disruptive Power of Google Glass
            A disruptive technology is a technology that displaces another technology. Thornburg (Laureate Education, 2014a) defines a disruptive technology as new technology with the same functionality of an existing technology. The new technology functions more efficiently. In fact, the new technology will obsolete the previous technology.
Google Glass is an example of a disruptive technology that can eventually replace cell phones and tablets. According to The Financial Express (2014, October) Google Glass displays information at eye level in a smartphone-like hands-free format. Similar to a smartphone, users can video record, make phone calls, take pictures and search the internet with voice commands. An article from Tech Life (2013, July) claims that within the overlay, there is a prism that beams light onto the user’s retina. The prism receives from a tiny projector inside the lens. The user can see the physical world and all relevant data regarding their physical world.

            Testers all over the world are using the Google Glass device to gather the social benefits of using it. Google Glass is an overlay of the world that users will see around them. According to Tech Life (2013, July) Google Glasses users get data and applications in the context of what they are doing or from where they are looking. Users can take pictures and video tape their surroundings. Users can get the time and weather report in their current location. The can map out and navigate their way to a destination. Users can translate information into a language they prefer. Google Glass (2014, October) also allows users to learn geographical and historical from their current location. Users can use the voice control to take notes with the feature Evernote. They can also use Google to find recipes while they are taking out their ingredients. Google Glass offers features for active users. Users can gage and map their walking, running, weightlifting, and circuit training workouts. In an educational setting. There are a few social implications as users engage in using Google Glass. Newman (2013, May) points out privacy violations. The device has a built-in camera that can sneakily take photos and video at any time. There are also social implications with etiquette. It may be rude to Google Glass a person’s profile when you are speaking directly to that person. Parents may also have a difficult time monitoring what their children are viewing through Google Glass. In a public school setting, the device may be useful for gathering data and performing laboratory exercises. However, the device may also promote academic dishonesty.

In five – ten years another emerging technology will replace Google Glass. Holography is an emerging technology which enables users to make three-dimensional images. Holograms use a laser, diffraction, light intensity recording and illumination. The image appears three-dimensional as the viewing system changes the position and orientation of the image. There is a projection that the use of holographic telepresence will bring digital participants and remote location to classrooms with the use of three-dimensional technology.



References
Applying google glass. (2014, October). The Financial Express. Retrieved from
How does google glass work. (2013, July). Tech Life. Retrieved from
Google Glass. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2014, from http://www.google.com/glass/start/
Laureate Education (Producer). (2014a). David Thornburg: Disruptive technologies [Video file].
Baltimore, MD: Author.
Newman, J. (2013, May). The real privacy implications of google glass. Time. Retrieved from

Friday, October 10, 2014

Responses to Module 3 Blg Post on Rymes of History Technology

Responses to Module 3

Blog Post on Rhymes of History Technology

Hi Dr. Thorn burg –
I have responded to the following classmate’s blog sites:
Patricia Marcino - http://marcipe.wordpress.com
Serbert Brooks -http://edtechviews.wordpress.com
Vaughn

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Module 3 Assignment Blog Post on Rhymes of History Technology


Module 3 Assignment Blog Post on Rhymes of History Technology

            Emerging technologies have the capability of rekindling societal patterns from the past. Dr. Thornburg (Laureate Education, 2014h) states through rhymes of history, the affect or impact of a new development rekindles something from the distant past. New technology brings a fresh emergence of the impact that users feel from a previous technology (Laureate Education, 2014j). Dr. Thornburg (Laureate Education, 2014h) points out that it is not the technology. The affect from the technology rekindles something from the past.

            An example of a technology that represents a rhyme in history is video streaming. Streaming media usage is growing exponentially over the past few years. Streaming technologies use compression to shrink the size of the audio and video files so that users can retrieve and play by remote in real time. In Houlton, Main the WHOU-FM station produces live video streams of many games it covers on its website. Clark (2014, September) states that video streaming of basketball games rekindles memories of success from the Houlton boys’ basketball team. A group of Houlton fans take a flight to Bangor to catch the Shiretowners at the Eastern Maine Class C semifinal and championship games. A week later, they rekindle the memory through watching the game through video streaming. Live video streaming of high school sports is relatively new to Maine, with several companies around the state providing the service.

                Private entities like WHOU seek to keep pace with video streaming technology, schools that provide the ultimate talent — the players and coaches — are experiencing their own learning curve regarding such issues as balancing the promotional exposure from the video streams with its possible impact on game attendance.


References

Clark, E. (2014, September). Live video streaming brings new audience to Maine high school


Laureate Education (Producer). (2014h). David Thornburg: Rhymes of history [Video file].

Baltimore, MD: Author.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Responses to Module 2 Assignment Blog Post on Emerging Technologies Tetr

Responses to Module 2 Assignment Blog Post on Emerging Technologies Tetrad
Hi Dr. Thorn burg –
I have responded to the following classmate’s blog sites:
Patricia Marcino - http://marcipe.wordpress.com
Serbert Brooks -http://edtechviews.wordpress.com
Vaughn